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DotNet Weekly
Liquid Newsletter Template Week:12
Year:2016
Date:2016-Mar-22
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Articles we enjoyed

Integrating ASP.NET Core Configuration in MVC 4
The biggest benefit of this new configuration system is that it’s not based on System.Configuration or web.config. Instead, it pulls from an ordered set of configuration providers that support a variety of file formats (such as XML and JSON) as well as environment variables. If one of the built-in configuration providers doesn’t meet your needs, you can write your own.

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About memory leaks again
Web applications are getting more and more complex from year to year. Couple of years ago nobody cared about the memory leaks on the web pages (yeah, they were really a set of web pages, but not web applications).

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Understanding CSRF, the video tutorial edition
Cross site request forgery is one of those attacks which remains enormously effective yet is frequently misunderstood. I’ve been running a bunch of security workshops for web developers around the globe recently and this is one of the topics we cover that often results in blank stares when I first ask about it. It usually unfolds that the developers have multiple resources at risk of a CSRF attack and if it’s not a classic web form style resource, then it’s frequently an API somewhere (you’re passing anti-forgery tokens to any APIs you wouldn’t want fraudulently called, right?!)

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Reusing JavaScript Template Literals
The word template in web programming makes one think of a reusable document or string you can combine with model data to produce output. Famous examples include Razor, Jade, and Handlebars. Template literals in JavaScript are not templates in this same sense, which is perhaps why they were originally referred to as quasi-literals in early specification work.

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Conditional Middleware in ASP.NET Core
Middlewares in ASP.NET first introduced in OWIN/Katana and became very famous in short time. ASP.NET 5 also support OWIN(and middlewares) in slightly different way. Middlewares allows you to assemble components in your application pipeline. The first registered component will execute first and then the first component decide whether to pass the request on to the next component in the pipeline.

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Essential .NET – Configuration in .NET Core
Just prior to press time, Microsoft announced name changes to ASP.NET 5 and related stacks. ASP.NET 5 is now ASP.NET Core 1.0. Entity Framework (EF) 7 is now Entity Framework (EF) Core 1.0. The ASP.NET 5 and EF7 packages and namespaces will change, but otherwise the new nomenclature has no impact on the lessons of this article.

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Getting started with app design
This blog is the first in a multi-part series on app design for developers. We’ll introduce you to the tricks of the design trade so you can create more attractive and more successful UWP apps.

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Roslyn scripting on CoreCLR (.NET CLI and DNX) and in memory assemblies
For a while now, the Roslyn C# scripting APIs (Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.CSharp.Scripting) have been portable, and supported cross platform usage. However, I recently ran into a few difficulties regarding using the Roslyn Scripting APIs in .NET CLI (which is replacing DNX) context. The solution was to use a lower level unmanaged CoreCLR API – and since they it’s not that well documented, I thought it would be beneficial to document it in a blog post.

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Bind a Visual Studio solution to a SonarQube project provisions and configures Roslyn analyzers
A few weeks ago, we announced the SonarQube scanner for MSBuild 2.0 supports 3rd party Roslyn analyzers. This has been working for the continuous integration build. In this blog post we are announcing that we have extended this experience to the IDE. You can now bind a Visual Studio solution to a SonarQube project and see Roslyn analyzers automatically provisioned as NuGet packages, and rulesets configured, using the SonarQube Quality Profile for the project. Let’s see what problem we are solving here, and how to use this new feature.  

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Libraries and Tools to the rescue

Open Sourcing the Visual Studio Productivity Power Tools

We’re excited to announce that we’re open-sourcing the Visual Studio Productivity Power Tools on GitHub. Productivity Power Tools, first released in 2010, is a pack of powerful extensions to improve developer productivity including Ctrl+Click Go to Definition, Copy As HTML, and Middle Click Scroll, just to name a few. Since their introduction, these tools have been updated for every major Visual Studio release, and a number of features that started out as part of the Productivity Power Tools are now core features of Visual Studio. Making the current set of tools available to the community is important to us, and we hope it will also inspire developers with concrete examples of what can be achieved with extensions of their own. Read more

Events/Webinars/Seminars you shouldn't miss

Building Blocks 2016

If you’re a cutting-edge developer—or you’d like to be—check out this series of Building Blocks interviews with popular experts, like Jon Galloway and Andy Wigley. These six interviews take place over three days, just two hours per day, so you can get all your questions answered. They are designed to help developers explore the latest and most exciting technologies and to show you what you can look forward to at this year’s //build conference. Read more

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