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DotNet Weekly
Liquid Newsletter Template Week:27
Year:2016
Date:2016-Jul-05
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Your weekly .NET update

Articles we enjoyed

First Steps: Exploring .NET Core and ASP.NET Core
.NET Core and ASP.NET Core 1.0 are finally here, and in this post I'll show how to get started with these new tools using the command line tooling. This is not meant to be your typical getting started tutorial that jumps right into Visual Studio and creates a Web project from there. Rather, the purpose of this post is to demonstrate some of the core underpinnings of how .NET Core and ASP.NET Core projects are bootstrapped and using the command line tooling is actually the best way to demonstrate this.

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Introducing ASP.NET Core Dependency Injection
If you developed professional Web applications using ASP.NET MVC, you are probably familiar with Dependency Injection. Dependency Injection (DI) is a technique to develop loosely coupled software systems. ASP.NET MVC didn't include any inbuilt DI framework and developers had to resort to some external DI framework.

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Application configuration in .NET Core – Part 1
.NET Core has a new way of working with configuration that is much more flexible than the way that previous versions of .NET have.

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.NET Backward Compatibility – Part 1
The history of .NET versioning is a complicated one, even when excluding the recent developments regarding .NET Core. Let’s start off by clarifying which components we are talking about: The .NET runtime (CLR), the base libraries (BCL) and the C# and VB languages are all versioned independently but released together as the .NET Framework, usually in combination with a new Visual Studio release.

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Authenticating a user with LinkedIn in ASP.NET Core
Learn how to use the new OAuth middleware in ASP.NET Core to authenticate a user.

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Data Binding – A Better Way to Implement Data Binding in .NET
Data binding is a powerful technique for developing UIs: It makes it easier to separate view logic from business logic, and easier to test the resulting code. Although present in the Microsoft .NET Framework since the beginning, data binding became more prominent with the advent of Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and XAML, as it forms the “glue” between the View and ViewModel in the Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) pattern.

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Upgrading to ASP.NET Core RTM from RC2
ASP.NET Core RTM is finally here.A big congratulation to the .NET Core and ASP.NET teams for getting this massive piece of software into our hands in release mode. It's been a long and challenging road, but looking where we've landed and where it appears where we're heading with .NET Core, I think it was well worth the wait and tribulations.

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Processing Data with ASP.NET MVC, JSX+React and TypeScript
Obviously, I think the combination of JSX, React and TypeScript is cool. I showed how to create a simple "Hello, World" Typescript/JSX+React Web page in aprevious column (that included showing how to configure an ASP.NET MVC project with TypeScript and React). In my last column, I went one step further and showed how to integrate a read-only form with ASP.NET MVC. This column builds on that to show how to both accept in that form and how to make AJAX calls back to an Action method in that MVC application.

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Essential .NET – Visual Studio 2015 with .NET Core Tooling
.NET Core RC2 is finally here, and this time it is, in fact, a true “Release Candidate” rather than an RC1 Beta masquerading as a release candidate (if that, considering all the changes that happened after it came out). Much of the development focus and press surrounding .NET Core is, of course, about its cross-platform capabilities. This focus on supporting Linux and Mac OS X has led not only to a new .NET API, but also to an accompanying runtime and even a toolset. Tools such as DOTNET.EXE (formerly DNX, DNVM and DNU), not to mention Visual Studio Code, are all about giving non-Microsoft developers an opportunity to leverage .NET, and even more, a first-class developer experience.

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Libraries and Tools to the rescue

Visual Studio Code vs WebStorm

One of the most important tools for a programmer is an IDE. Sure, we can use a text editor (Notepad, Vim or Emacs to name a few), but realistically it is difficult to work on a modern project without the help provided by IDE: IntelliSense, support for build automation and test frameworks, debugger, version control tools and many more. In my current project frontend developers are using WebStorm form JetBrains. Read more

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